“Nieuwe en betere tijden” Neef Henk Tepper Canada

https://www.facebook.com/stephanie.tepper.1/timeline/story?ut=32&wstart=-2051193600&wend=2147483647&hash=10153356584370661&pagefilter=3Bé fam 2

Bé en Jantje Tepper samen met afgestudeerde kleindochter ( van Henk) Stephanie.Bé fam 1

Henk Tepper Canada met zijn vrouw en beide dochters Stephanie en KimberlyBé met kleindochterChristine Dionne  Kleindochter ( van Harmien) met Bé Tepper ook feest en geslaagd. Trotse opa mocht met kleindochter het bal openen.

 

Henk Tepper, farmer Canada, suing federal government after year in Beirut jail (Claim schade regering Canada)

OTTAWA — A New Brunswick farmer who spent more than a year in a Beirut jail on allegations that he shipped rotten potatoes to Algeria is suing the Canadian government, arguing it didn’t protect his Charter rights.

Henk Tepper says in a statement of claim filed today with the Federal Court in Ottawa that the government didn’t do enough to try to secure his release.

The $16.5-million lawsuit also says the RCMP provided misinformation to Algerian authorities prior to Tepper’s arrest.

The claims in the lawsuit have not been proven in court.

( eindelijk mag het recht zegevieren. Neef Henk Tepper claimt zijn schade van 16.5 miljoen dollar bij de Canadese regering)

RTV Noord van 7 mei 2013:

De van oorsprong Groningse aardappelboer Henk Tepper spant een rechtszaak aan tegen de Canadese overheid. Maandagmorgen heeft hij de papieren officieel op de bus gedaan. Hij eist 16.5 miljoen dollar.

Tepper heeft een jaar onterecht vastgezeten in een cel in Libanon en de regering in Canada deed helemaal niets voor hem. Hij had eerder 1800 ton goedgekeurde aardappelen geleverd aan Algerije, toen later in een deel daarvan, drie ton, de ziekte ringrot werd geconstateerd.

Aardappelboer Tepper werd hiervoor opgepakt in Libanon en heeft onder schrijnende omstandigheden vastgezeten. En daar moet de Canadese overheid voor boeten, vindt hij. Uiteindelijk kwam hij vrij na ingrijpen van de president, maar klopte de Canadese overheid zich op de borst.

The story of Henk Tepper Dutch and English

 How did I experienced it as uncle, soon my story. Have already spoken with Henk.  ( Hoe heb ik het als oom ervaren, binnenkort mijn verhaal. Heb reeds met neef Henk gesproken.

Mijn verhaal ( de hel van 373 dagen ) in 30 pagina, heb de inhoud met Henk besproken/ /klik op onderstaande link. Iedere aardappel exporteur zou het moeten lezen.  ( The story of Henk Tepper in Dutch, English )

http://www.freehenktepper.nl/wp-content/uploads/storyhenk.docx

http://www.freehenktepper.nl/wp-content/uploads/storyhenkenglish.docx
 

 

 

( Update)Nephew Henk Tepper Canada is free!!

(A news conference is scheduled for Monday with Tepper,sister and his lawyers in Grand Falls. Een persconferentie is gepland op maandag Henk Tepper,zuster met de advocaten //CBC news)

Neef Henk met familie weer bij elkaar in Ottawa, na aankomst vliegtuig uit Libanon//Henk together again with his family in Ottawa, after arriving plane from Lebanon

Press Statement From the Family

March 31, 2012

 

In March 2011 we heard the horrible news that our brother, son, father, husband, uncle, friend Henk Tepper was detained in a Lebanese Jail.

373 days later we have a joyful reunion and Henk is back on Canadian soil.

I want to take this time to thank the Canadian public who has kept us in their prayers and thoughts. The last time when I went to visit Henk in Beirut I met two stewards on the air Canada flight and once they found out that I was Henk’s sister they came over and talked to me because they had followed Henk’s story. There are so many strangers who have come up to us and showed us their concerns. The Canadian public has kept us going.

I also want to thank the team who brought Henk back home; Joe Karam, the lawyer from Beirut; Jim Mockler the lawyer from Saint John; Senators Pierrette Ringuette and Mac Harb; Liberal MP Dominic LeBlanc. The team has worked diligently and has successfully brought Henk back to Canada.

Last but not least I would like to thank all the people in Lebanon who believed in Henk and who made it possible for Henk to be with his family at Easter next week. The people in Beirut have been very caring and courageous to make this happen and you will be in our thoughts forever.

At this time I am going to ask the media to respect our privacy and when the family is ready for a public statement the media will be contacted. Thank you.

Sc


Family of Henk Tepper

  The following is a statement from the family of Henk Tepper:

“As we approach one year without our beloved Henk, we wish to thank everyone for their thoughts and prayers.

During this difficult year of birthdays, graduations, anniversaries and Christmas without Henk, we have been able to remain strong as a family due to the love and support of friends and strangers alike. For this, our most sincere thank you.

We also want to thank everyone for respecting our privacy. There will be an appropriate time to speak and we hope that time comes soon.” “

Telegraph Journal 5 januai 2011

A former Canadian diplomat says the federal government often uses letters from the prime minister to help free Canadians jailed abroad.

Gar Pardy, a former Canadian diplomat, says the answer to freeing Henk Tepper may lie with Algeria and not Lebanon.

It works roughly half the time, according to Gar Pardy, former Canadian ambassador to Costa Rica, Honduras, Nicaragua, Panama, and El Salvador.

But in the ongoing saga of New Brunswick potato farmer Henk Tepper, the Canadian government may be focusing its attention on the wrong country, and should be looking to Algeria, the source of the criminal charges, Pardy said.

He also said Lebanon may not be willing to provide Canada a with a political favour because of its pro-Israel foreign policy stance.

Canada’s Minister of State for Foreign Affairs Diane Ablonczy has insisted that a simple letter to Lebanon will not return the imprisoned farmer home. Tepper’s lawyer and a New Brunswick senator have stated otherwise after meeting with Lebanese Justice Minister Shakib Qortbawi in Beirut.

“It’s a technique we have used over the years,” Pardy said. “Sometimes you can use a letter from the head of government here to the head of government there.

“It’s a common technique that one uses, every government uses it.”

Tepper was imprisoned on March 23 as he arrived in Lebanon on a trade mission.

He has been held on allegations that some potatoes he exported to Algeria in 2007 were rotten.

An Interpol “red notice” that remains in place stating that the Algerian government called for his detention for the alleged use of a forged document to clear rotten food for sale for human consumption.

Pardy, who retired as director general of the consular affairs bureau in 2003, said he is unaware how often the Harper government flexes its political muscle, but added that the letter could be crafted in a way to evoke humanitarian and compassionate grounds.

“In Henk’s case: ‘The poor man is suffering from this incarceration, his family and business in Canada is going to the dogs,’?” Pardy said. “That’s what you cue on here and the one thing you do not do is accuse the other government.

“You take the soft peddle and sometimes it works and sometimes it doesn’t.”

Pardy said such a letter was used in the cases of Maher Arar, detained in Syria in 2002 for almost a year, and William Sampson who was detained in Saudi Arabia in 2000 for 32 months.

“We used to use the prime ministerial letter with some regularity,” he said.

Pardy said that a letter to Lebanon could do little since the country is stuck in the middle of the dispute and is not dilomatically well-disposed to Canada.

“The solution to the case is not necessarily in Lebanon,” Pardy said. “I think it is expecting too much for the Lebanese government to ignore the Interpol request.

“Canada’s relationship with countries in the Middle East is not very good, it’s getting worse, largely based on the decision by the Canadian government to put Israel on top of our relationship totem in the Middle East.”

Pardy said the Lebanese government is “dominated” by the Muslim militant group and political party Hezbollah.

“Hezbollah has Israel on the top of its list for other reasons,” Pardy said, noting the 2006 Israel-Hezbollah War, which killed an estimated 1,200 people, mostly Lebanese citizens, while displacing roughly one million others.

“It is in part in that larger context that you may never get a positive decision by the Lebanese government for it to ignore the Interpol request,” he said.

“It doesn’t get talked about because this government does not want to talk about the collateral damage as result of its policy on Israel and the Lebanese are quite prepared, I’m sure, to hide behind the Interpol notice.”

Pardy said Canada stands a better chance with Algeria, citing a better political relationship and the successful presence of Canadian oil and gas producers in that country.

“It could be the better way to go,” he said. “In my mind the answer is more in Algiers than in Beirut.”

Kim Richard Nossal, director of the Centre for International and Defence Policy at Queen’s University, said that, even with persuasion from political officials, the extradition of an citizen from one country to another is a lengthy process.

“Extradition is a slow process that involves the legal systems of different countries,” Nossal said. “Our legal system grinds incredibly slow even for Canadians and then add the international factor to that and you’ve just got an incredibly slow process.

“The only way to make it less slow is when the political leadership involves itself in the process and then those who say you have to be careful when doing that are absolutely correct.”

He added: “You really do have to worry about being seen as pushing your weight around and trying to interfere in the process because keep in mind if the shoe was on the other foot.”

Pardy said that Tepper’s detention is not an extraordinary case.

“There is a process that goes into play here,” Pardy said. “Even nine months in a Lebanese jail is not a long time.

“Extradition is a very large, oval process.”

Dag en nacht strijden voor neef Henk/ Struggling day and night, for cousin Henk

Dag en nacht strijden voor neef Henk
INTERVIEW HENK TEPPER
Door René Beishuizen ( DvhN 27 dec 2011)

(English translation scroll down)Het jaar 2011 nadert zijn einde.

Twaalf maanden liggen achter ons. Maanden waarin op wereldschaal zoveel gebeurde maar waarin ook tal van OostGroningers in hun veel kleinere wereld mooie en minder mooie avonturen beleefden. Tien van die Oost- Groningers vertellen daar de komende dagen op deze plek over. Vandaag aflevering 6: Henk Tepper uit Zuidbroek.

Zuidbroek “Wanneer ’s avonds laat de telefoon gaat, hoop je dat je Canada aan de lijn hebt. Zegt die meneer aan de andere kant van de lijn dat hij verkeerd verbonden is.”

Henk Tepper uit Zuidbroek lacht als een boer met kiespijn.

Sinds 23 maart van dit jaar zit zijn neef Henk Tepper (44), aardappelboer in Canada en tot zijn 12de jaar woonachtig in Kropswolde, in de gevangenis in Libanon. Tepper heeft sinds ruim vier jaar een zakelijk conflictmet Algerije over de levering van aardappelen. Een deel zou verziekt zijn door ringrot. Hij spande vanwege dit conflict en het mislopen van veel geld een proces aan. Algerije zette hem op de Interpollijst van gezochte personen.

Tepper wist dit niet en werd in Libanon aangehouden en in de cel gezet.

Daar zit hij, onder erbarmelijke omstandigheden, met meerdere personen in een cel.

Sinds die tijd strijdt Zuidbroekster Henk Tepper 24 uur per dag, zeven dagen in de week voor de vrijheid van zijn neef. Dit ’gevecht’ kost niet alleen veel tijd, maar ook energie. Daarom stapte hij in september dit jaar uit de gemeenteraad van Menterwolde. Tepper: “Ik ben een familiemens. Familie gaat boven alles.” De VVD’er was via voorkeurstemmen in de raad terechtgekomen.

“Ik heb het gevoel dat demensen achter de schermen bezig zijn om hem vrij te krijgen”, zegt Tepper.

Volgens hem hoeft de Canadese regering alleen maar te bellenmet de officier van justitie in Libanon en neef Henk, die Canadees staatsburger is, kan terug naar Canada. “Libanon zit ook met Henk in de maag.

Canada zegt dat Libanon niet heeft gevraagd te reageren. Je houdt het niet voor mogelijk.”

De Zuidbroekster wordt er bijkansmoedeloos van. “Na dertig dagen dachten we ook dat hij naar huis zou komen. Na zestig en negentig dagen dachtenwe datweer.”

Maar Tepper is een vechter en zal niet eerder stoppen voor zijn naamgenoot vrij is. Via zijn weblog freehenktepper.nl houdt hij dewereld op de hoogte. Inmiddels besteden de Canadesemedia bijna dagelijks aandacht aan deze zaak. Dat biedt de familie hoop. “Ik snap niet dat de wereld zo in elkaar zit.”
English Translation (by Chris Ubels)

Struggling day and night, for cousin Henk

INTERVIEW HENK TEPPER

By René Beishuizen

The year 2011 approaches its end.

Zuidbroek “When the Phone rings at night, you hope it will be Canada on the other end. And then the man on the line says he has the wrong number…”

Henk Tepper uit Zuidbroek laughs in a painful manner.

Since march 23rd cousin Henk Tepper(44), who is a farmer in Canada and lived in Kropswolde, Netherlands, until the age of 12, has been in a prison cell in Lebanon. Tepper has had a business conflict with Algeria for four years regarding the shipment of potatoes. Part of which alegelibly was infected with Ring-Rott. He then sued Algeria for this conflict and for losing a lot of money. Algeria then put him on a Red Notice for wanted people with Interpol.

Tepper was not aware of this and was arrested on arrival to Lebanon and was put in jail.

There he resides, in terrible circumstances, with many inmates crammed together in a cell.

Ever since Zuidbroek citizen Henk Tepper struggles 24 hours a day, seven days a week, for freedom for his cousin. This fight not only consumes a lot of time, but also energy. That is why Tepper stopped being a councilor in Menterwolde, the county to which Zuidbroek belongs. Tepper: “I am a family man. Family goes above everything.” The VVD (liberal) member was directly chosen by many voters.

“I have the feeling that behind the curtains people are trying to get him out.”, Tepper states.

According to him all the Canadian government has to do is call the disctrict attorney for Lebanon and cousin Henk, who is a Canadian citizen, can return to Canada. “For Lebanon this case is difficult too. But Canada sais Lebanon did not ask to respond. I cannot believe it”

The man from Zuidbroek is almost despirited. “After thirty days we thought it would be over. After sixty and ninety days we thought the same thing…”

But Tepper is a fighter and will not rest until his cousin, who has the same name, will be free. Through his weblog www.freehenktepper.nl he keeps the World posted. Now the Canadian media gives attention to the matter on a daily basis. That offers hope to the family. “I cannot understand the World can work this way.”

Ottawa could free Henk Tepper with a letter

Vertaling/samengevat: scroll naar beneden

International law expert finds the federal government’s actions ‘confusing’

An expert in international law can’t understand why the Harper government is not acting swiftly to get Henk Tepper back to Canada.

The New Brunswick farmer has spent nine months in a Beirut jail for allegedly exporting bad potatoes to Algeria.

Paul Cavaluzzo, a lawyer, says two Canadian senators have said that Lebanese authorities would release Tepper if Canada sends a letter requesting he be returned. If that’s true, Cavaluzzo says, then Ottawa’s concern about interfering in Lebanon’s judicial system is not a valid one.

“It’s very confusing as to the intransigence they seem to be demonstrating because the Lebanese obviously, I think, are looking for a reason to release Mr. Tepper back to Canada, and what they seem to be waiting for is a letter,” he said.

Cavaluzzo says there’s an even more compelling reason to have Hank Tepper back in Canada.

“The most important fact here is that [the alleged crime] occurred in Canada, by a Canadian. And as a result of that, Canada has jurisdiction if a crime occurred, to prosecute him. He’s a Canadian, he should be prosecuted in Canada,” he said.

Tepper, 44, has been behind bars in Beirut with no charges against him since March. He was arrested on the Interpol warrant while on a trade mission trip sponsored by the Canadian government. He says he was innocent and his lawyers argue that the potatoes were inspected in Canada and met Algerian standards.

Cavaluzzo was involved in the Maher Arar case, which he says was resolved once enough political pressure was put on the federal government. The lawyer believes the same would happen in Henk Tepper’s case.

Vertaling en samengevat: De Canadese regering zou alleen maar een brief hoeven te schrijven met de vraag aan de Libanese regering Henk Vrij te laten. Dat vragen de Libanese regering. Volgens een deskundige over de wet van Canada kan het helemaal niet. De aardappelen zijn goed gekeurd door de Canadese foodinspectie, volgens de Algerijnse normen. Henk kan niet geknoeid hebben met de documenten, want hij was in Canada en niet in Algerije. De RCMP( canadese politie waren op de hoogte) De Canadese regering liet Henk met een delegatie naar Libanon gaan, op kosten van de regering. Deskundigen buigen zich nu over de case.

Ottawa says letter won’t free Henk Tepper

Baird’s office denies claims of legal expert

CBC News

Posted: Dec 22, 2011 1:43 PM ET

Last Updated: Dec 22, 2011 9:29 PM ET

Related

Related Links

P.O.V. : Should the prime minister intervene on Henk Tepper’s behalf

RCMP gave potato farmer’s financial details to Algerians

Tepper farm gets creditor protection extension

Jailed potato farmer in limbo over letter dispute

External Links

Read the Interpol ‘red notice’ for Henk Tepper

(Note:CBC does not endorse and is not responsible for the content of external links.)

A letter from the federal government counters the claims of an expert in international law about how to free N.B. potato farmer Henk Tepper.

Tepper has spent nine months in a Beirut jail for allegedly exporting bad potatoes to Algeria.

Paul Cavaluzzo, a lawyer, says he can’t understand why the Harper government is not acting swiftly to get Tepper back to Canada.

He also says two Canadian senators have said that Lebanese authorities would release Tepper if Canada sends a letter requesting he be returned. If that’s true, Cavaluzzo says, then Ottawa’s concern about interfering in Lebanon’s judicial system is not a valid one.

“It’s very confusing as to the intransigence they seem to be demonstrating because the Lebanese obviously, I think, are looking for a reason to release Mr. Tepper back to Canada, and what they seem to be waiting for is a letter,” he said.

In a letter originally sent to Senator Pierre Ringuette, then forwarded to CBC News Thursday, Foreign Affairs Minister John Baird and Minister of State of Foreign Affairs Diane Ablonczy “correct the record regarding incorrect information.”

The letter goes on to say that the Lebanese government has communicated to the government of Canada that “a resolution through the Lebanese legal system is not as simple as sending one letter.”

The government also lays out the work it says it’s done to bring Tepper home, citing the sending of letters and diplomatic notes.

Meanwhile, Cavaluzzo says there’s an even more compelling reason to have Tepper back in Canada.

“The most important fact here is that [the alleged crime] occurred in Canada, by a Canadian. And as a result of that, Canada has jurisdiction if a crime occurred, to prosecute him. He’s a Canadian, he should be prosecuted in Canada,” he said.

Tepper, 44, has been behind bars in Beirut with no charges against him since March 23. He was arrested on the Interpol warrant while on a trade mission trip sponsored by the Canadian government. He says he is innocent and his lawyers argue that the potatoes were inspected in Canada and met Algerian standards.

Cavaluzzo was involved in the Maher Arar case, which he says was resolved once enough political pressure was put on the federal government. The lawyer believes the same would happen in Henk Tepper’s case.

 

 

Bring Home Henk Tepper

Irwin Cotler     Member of Parliament, Mount Royal

This week, family and friends have intensified their pleas for the release of Henk Tepper, a New Brunswick farmer who has been languishing in a Beirut prison absent any criminal charges since March.

2011-12-21-Tepperbody.jpg

While his loved ones hope to see him returned to Canada in time for the holidays, his case and other high-profile cases of Canadians detained abroad raise important questions about what Canada’s role ought to be in such situations. Further, the Government’s action — or rather, seeming inaction — on the file raises questions about the nature of the relationship between Canada and Lebanon.

By way of background, Tepper was arrested on an Interpol warrant while on a trade mission sponsored by the Canadian government. Allegedly, he forged paperwork to export a rotten shipment of potatoes to Algeria in 2007. Tepper insists he is innocent and his lawyers assert that the potatoes were inspected in Canada and met Algerian standards.

Serious questions have been raised about why, given the incident in question occurred in 2007, Mr. Tepper has been able to leave and re-enter Canada with no problems since and why he was not arrested here if in fact the supposed criminality occurred on Canadian soil.

Absent formal charges, Canada should not acquiesce in Tepper’s detention. Indeed, even if he were to have engaged in some criminality, he should be in Canada and afforded due process before Canadian courts.

The Government has been probed on the matter in Question Period and has provided essentially stock responses insisting Mr. Tepper is receiving consular assistance. On November 30, the Government revealed that it was choosing to resolve the situation through “quiet and diplomatic channels.”

While there is merit to quiet diplomacy — particularly with close allies — it is curious that the Government has not come out more strongly against Lebanon. Indeed, Hezbollah, a listed terrorist entity in Canada, officially forms part of the Lebanese government.

Further, as the New York Times reported this week, the Lebanese Canadian Bank has been a hub for the financing of Hezbollah. Simply put, why are we tip-toeing around a Government bound-up with a designated terrorist entity under Canadian law and whose own dealings appear replete with money-laundering operations?

Regrettably, Tepper’s dubious detention will not be the last of a Canadian citizen abroad. In this regard, I recently re-introduced legislation entitled the Protecting Canadians Abroad Act (C-359), which died in the last Parliament without debate. This legislation, the first ever of its kind in Canada, would affirm rights and obligations — including rights to consular access, consular visits, and repatriation — for Canadians detained, disappeared, or captured abroad.

Further, the bill would establish reporting requirements for Canadian officials when they suspect a Canadian detained or captured abroad has been or may be tortured. Moreover, the bill would require that the government request the repatriation of a Canadian detained abroad in situations where there are reasonable grounds to believe that the Canadian has or may be tortured, is being subjected to conditions constituting cruel or unusual punishment, or is being arbitrarily detained.

The legislation also — and perhaps most importantly — allows recourse against the federal government should it not undertake its obligations and responsibilities. Indeed, it would specifically allow suits against ministers if they did not undertake certain obligations, such as seeking someone’s repatriation.

In short, the conferral of Canadian citizenship upon an individual implies certain obligations on the part of the federal government and all Canadian citizens deserve to benefit equally from the rights conferred through citizenship. Indeed, all Canadian citizens deserve government protection while located abroad. In this case, it means bringing Henk Tepper home.

Irwin Cotler is the Member of Parliament for Mount Royal and the former Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada. He has extensively on Middle East matters, including Lebanon